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A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction
A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction
A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction
A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction

A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (Center for Environmental Structure Series)

Product ID : 16059203
4.8 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 16059203
UPC / ISBN 0195019199
Shipping Weight 2.15 lbs
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Binding: Hardcover
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Manufacturer Oxford University Press
Shipping Dimension 7.87 x 5.67 x 2.13 inches
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Brand Oxford University Press USA
Number Of Pages 1171
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 1977
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About A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction

Product Description You can use this book to design a house for yourself with your family; you can use it to work with your neighbors to improve your town and neighborhood; you can use it to design an office, or a workshop, or a public building. And you can use it to guide you in the actual process of construction. After a ten-year silence, Christopher Alexander and his colleagues at the Center for Environmental Structure are now publishing a major statement in the form of three books which will, in their words, "lay the basis for an entirely new approach to architecture, building and planning, which will we hope replace existing ideas and practices entirely." The three books are The Timeless Way of Building, The Oregon Experiment, and this book, A Pattern Language. At the core of these books is the idea that people should design for themselves their own houses, streets, and communities. This idea may be radical (it implies a radical transformation of the architectural profession) but it comes simply from the observation that most of the wonderful places of the world were not made by architects but by the people. At the core of the books, too, is the point that in designing their environments people always rely on certain "languages," which, like the languages we speak, allow them to articulate and communicate an infinite variety of designs within a forma system which gives them coherence. This book provides a language of this kind. It will enable a person to make a design for almost any kind of building, or any part of the built environment. "Patterns," the units of this language, are answers to design problems (How high should a window sill be? How many stories should a building have? How much space in a neighborhood should be devoted to grass and trees?). More than 250 of the patterns in this pattern language are given: each consists of a problem statement, a discussion of the problem with an illustration, and a solution. As the authors say in their introduction, many of the patterns are archetypal, so deeply rooted in the nature of things that it seemly likely that they will be a part of human nature, and human action, as much in five hundred years as they are today. Amazon.com Review The second of three books published by the Center for Environmental Structure to provide a "working alternative to our present ideas about architecture, building, and planning," A Pattern Language offers a practical language for building and planning based on natural considerations. The reader is given an overview of some 250 patterns that are the units of this language, each consisting of a design problem, discussion, illustration, and solution. By understanding recurrent design problems in our environment, readers can identify extant patterns in their own design projects and use these patterns to create a language of their own. Extraordinarily thorough, coherent, and accessible, this book has become a bible for homebuilders, contractors, and developers who care about creating healthy, high-level design. Review "A wise old owl of a book, one to curl up with in an inglenook on a rainy day. Alexander may be the closest thing home design has to a Zen master." The New York Times "A classic. A must read. "T. Colbert, University of Houston "The design student's bible for relativistic environmental design. "Melinda La Garce, Southern Illinois University "Brilliant, Here's how to design or redesign any space you're living or working infrom metropolis to room. Consider what you want to happen in the space, and then page through this book. Its radically conservative observations will spark, enhance, organize your best ideas, and a wondrous home, workplace, town will result." San Francisco Chronicle "The most important book in architecture and planning for many decades, a landmark whose clarity and humanity give hope that our private and public spaces can yet be made gracefully habitable." The Next Whole Earth Catalog. From the B