X

Buy Products not in the Philippines

Galleon.PH - Discover, Share, Buy!
Media Law and Human Rights
Media Law and Human Rights
Media Law and Human Rights

Media Law and Human Rights

Product ID : 36979339


Galleon Product ID 36979339
UPC / ISBN 0199217505
Shipping Weight 1.15 lbs
I think this is wrong?
Binding: Paperback
(see available options)
Model
Manufacturer
Shipping Dimension 9.06 x 6.14 x 0.87 inches
I think this is wrong?
Edition 2
Number Of Pages 300
Publication Date 2009-04-15
Release Date 2009-04-15
-
Save 33%
Before ₱ 11,760
7,929

*Price and Stocks may change without prior notice
  • 3 Day Return Policy
  • All products are genuine and original
  • Cash On Delivery/Cash Upon Pickup Available

Pay with

About Media Law And Human Rights

The incorporation of the European Convention of Human Rights in UK Law, has made the principle of free speech a positive right. But what is the law of freedom of expression and privacy and how does it affect the media? This new edition of Media Law and Human Rights provides practical coverage of the impact of human rights principles in media law. Providing a comprehensive guide to the Strasbourg case law as it affects the media, this book also examines how the UK courts have grappled with the concepts of privacy and freedom of expression as developed by the European Court. It considers the potential for further influence and looks at the special provisions in the structure of the Human Rights Act and how, if the UK courts still do not provide a remedy, a case can be taken to Strasbourg. This new edition offers comprehensive and up to date coverage of the all the important English case law and decisions of the European Court of Human Rights that have occurred since the publication of the first edition, including key cases on libel, such as Steel and Morris v UK (McLibel), privacy such as Douglas v Hello, and race hatred such as Norwood v UK. Coverage of major developments outside the UK and Europe including decisions of the US, and Canadian Supreme Courts and the South African Constitutional Court is also included. This title particularly investigates the issues concerning Article 10 as regards its guarantee of freedom of expression. The right is not absolute, but judgments of the European Court of Human Rights have illustrated how valuable the Convention has been in maintaining freedom of expression. The Contempt of Court Act, rights of appeal against reporting restrictions, and the new approach to privilege in libel have all been the product of Article 10. The authors also consider how the courts have responded to the Human Rights Act, in particular the way in which the interrelationship between the right to respect for privacy a