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Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and
Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and
Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and
Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and

Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives

Product ID : 16024140


Galleon Product ID 16024140
UPC / ISBN 0765761262
Shipping Weight 1.9 lbs
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Binding: Hardcover
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Model
Manufacturer Jason Aronson
Shipping Dimension 9.37 x 6.46 x 1.42 inches
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Author Sanford L. Drob
Edition First Edition
Number Of Pages 436
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 2000-11-01
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About Symbols Of The Kabbalah: Philosophical And

Product Description Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives provides a philosophical and psychological interpretation of the major symbols of the theosophical Kabbalah. It shows that the Kabbalah, particularly as it is expressed in the school of Isaac Luria, provides a coherent and comprehensive account of the cosmos, and humanity's role within it, that is intellectually, morally, and spiritually significant for contemporary life. About the Author Sanford L. Drob is Director of Psychological Assessment and the Senior Forensic Psychologist at Bellevue Hospital in New York. He holds doctorate degrees in Philosophy from Boston University and in Clinical Psychology from Long Island University. In 1987 he co-founded, and for several years served as editor-in-chief of, the New York Jewish Review, a publication addressing the interface between traditional Judaism and contemporary thought. In addition to numerous publications in clinical, forensic, and philosophical psychology, Dr. Drob's articles on Jewish philosophy have appeared in such journals as Tradition, The Reconstructionist, and Cross Currents. His philosophical and psychological interests originally led him to the study of Chassidus. For the past fifteen years he has engaged in intensive study of the Kabbalah, the problems of God, Mind, and Evil, and the relationship between Jewish mysticism and other traditions in the history of Western and Eastern thought.