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Notes on Nursing

Product ID : 35302989


Galleon Product ID 35302989
UPC / ISBN 1512261114
Shipping Weight 0.51 lbs
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Binding: Paperback
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Model
Manufacturer
Shipping Dimension 9.02 x 5.98 x 0.28 inches
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Author Florence Nightingale
Edition 1
Number Of Pages 116
Publication Date 2015-05-18
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607

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Description

Notes on Nursing is a classic historical nursing education text by Florence Nightingale. The following nursing notes are by no means intended as a rule of thought by which nurses can teach themselves to nurse, still less as a nursing manual to teach nurses to nurse. They are meant simply to give hints for thought to women who have personal charge of the health of others. Every woman, or at least almost every woman, in England has, at one time or another of her life, charge of the personal health of somebody, whether child or invalid,--in other words, every woman is a nurse. Florence Nightingale (12 May 1820 – 13 August 1910) was an English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing. Nightingale came to prominence while serving as a manager of nurses trained by her during the Crimean War, where she organised the tending to wounded soldiers.[3] She gave nursing a highly favourable reputation and became an icon of Victorian culture, especially in the persona of "The Lady with the Lamp" making rounds of wounded soldiers at night. While recent commentators have asserted Nightingale's achievements in the Crimean War were exaggerated by the media at the time, critics agree on the decisive importance of her follow-up achievements in professionalising nursing roles for women.[6] In 1860, Nightingale laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment of her nursing school at St Thomas' Hospital in London. It was the first secular nursing school in the world, now part of King's College London. In recognition of her pioneering work in nursing, the Nightingale Pledge taken by new nurses, and the Florence Nightingale Medal, the highest international distinction a nurse can achieve, were named in her honour, and the annual International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world on her birthday. Her social reforms include improving healthcare for all sections of British society, advocating better hunger relief in India, helping to abolish pr