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The 100 Hour War: The Conflict Between Honduras And
The 100 Hour War: The Conflict Between Honduras And
The 100 Hour War: The Conflict Between Honduras And

The 100 Hour War: The Conflict Between Honduras And El Salvador In July 1969 (Latin [email protected])

Product ID : 38409211
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Galleon Product ID 38409211
UPC / ISBN 1911096508
Shipping Weight 0.79 lbs
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Binding: Paperback
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Model
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Shipping Dimension 11.5 x 8.19 x 0.31 inches
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Number Of Pages 104
Publication Date 2017-07-27
Release Date 2017-08-10
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About The 100 Hour War: The Conflict Between Honduras And

In July 1969, while the world was expectant about the upcoming first manned landing on the moon, two little-known Central American States crossed sabers in what was derogatorily coined by the media as 'The Soccer War'. Far from a simple out-of-hand sports passion, this conflict had its complicated origins back in the early 20th century when the North American companies United Fruit and its rival, Standard Fruit, operated in Honduras - and both deemed it necessary to import workers from El Salvador, since the locals were insufficient in numbers. What followed was an exodus of more than 300,000 Salvadorans who settled in Honduras - and for a while, the latter country’s government saw this with good eyes. That is until the early 1960s, when political changes and the liberalization of the region's commerce through the Common Market Treaty made it painfully evident that the country that benefited the most from it was El Salvador, while Honduras would be destined to carry a heavy economic burden. Inevitably, it chilled the relations between the two countries and had a direct bearing in the treatment from the Hondurans towards the Salvadoran peasants. Amidst sporadic violence against the immigrant peasants, the two governments began negotiations aimed at solving the immigration problem and signed three agreements. However, while the negotiations were taking place, clandestine armed groups were organized in Honduras with the purpose of harassing and controlling the Salvadoran people living in that country. This situation was worsened by a coup d'etat that brought to the presidency the Honduran General Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, who had a very different point of view than his predecessor regarding the immigrants' situation. Shortly after, the expelling of thousands of Salvadorans began. The return of the peasants to El Salvador brought a series of problems for that country, since all were returning unemployed and needing food, clothing and some kind of shelter - all of this in