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Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky
Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky
Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky

Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky Translation (Vintage Classics)

Product ID : 16654239
4.7 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 16654239
UPC / ISBN 0679734503
Shipping Weight 1.17 lbs
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Binding: Paperback
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Model
Manufacturer Vintage
Shipping Dimension 7.95 x 5.2 x 1.54 inches
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Author Fyodor Dostoevsky
Brand Vintage
Color Multicolor
Edition Reprint
Number Of Pages 565
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 1993-03-02
Release Date 1993-03-02
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Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky Features

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About Crime And Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky

Product Description Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read With the same suppleness, energy, and range of voices that won their translation of The Brothers Karamazov the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, Pevear and Volokhonsky offer a brilliant translation of Dostoevsky's classic novel that presents a clear insight into this astounding psychological thriller. "The best (translation) currently available"--Washington Post Book World. From Publishers Weekly An acclaimed new translation of the classic Russian novel. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. Review “The best [translation of Crime and Punishment] currently available…An especially faithful re-creation…with a coiled-spring kinetic energy…Don’t miss it.” – Washington Post Book World “This fresh, new translation…provides a more exact, idiomatic, and contemporary rendition of the novel that brings Fyodor Dostoevsky’s tale achingly alive…It succeeds beautifully.” – San Francisco Chronicle “Reaches as close to Dostoevsky’s Russian as is possible in English…The original’s force and frightening immediacy is captured…The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation will become the standard English version.”– Chicago Tribune From the Inside Flap With the same suppleness, energy, and range of voices that won their translation of The Brothers Karamazov the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, Pevear and Volokhonsky offer a brilliant translation of Dostoevsky's classic novel that presents a clear insight into this astounding psychological thriller. "The best (translation) currently available"--Washington Post Book World. About the Author Fyodor Mikailovich Dostoevsky’s life was as dark and dramatic as the great novels he wrote. He was born in Moscow in 1821. A short first novel,  Poor Folk (1846) brought him instant success, but his writing career was cut short by his arrest for alleged subversion against Tsar Nicholas I in 1849. In prison he was given the “silent treatment” for eight months (guards even wore velvet soled boots) before he was led in front a firing squad. Dressed in a death shroud, he faced an open grave and awaited execution, when suddenly, an order arrived commuting his sentence. He then spent four years at hard labor in a Siberian prison, where he began to suffer from epilepsy, and he returned to St. Petersburg only a full ten years after he had left in chains. His prison experiences coupled with his conversion to a profoundly religious philosophy formed the basis for his great novels. But it was his fortuitous marriage to Anna Snitkina, following a period of utter destitution brought about by his compulsive gambling, that gave Dostoevsky the emotional stability to complete  Crime and Punishment (1866),  The Idiot (1868-69),  The Possessed (1871-72),and  The Brothers Karamazov (1879-80). When Dostoevsky died in 1881, he left a legacy of masterworks that influenced the great thinkers and writers of the Western world and immortalized him as a giant among writers of world literature. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. CHAPTER 1 On an exceptionally hot evening early in July a young man came out of the garret in which he lodged in S. Place and walked slowly, as though in hesitation, towards K. Bridge. He had successfully avoided meeting his landlady on the staircase. His garret was under the roof of a high, five-storied house, and was more like a cupboard than a room. The landlady, who provided him with garret, dinners, and attendance, lived on the floor below, and every time he went out he was obliged to pass her kitchen, the door of which invariably stood open. And each time he passed, the young man had a sick, frightened feeling, which made him scowl and feel ashamed. He was hopelessly in debt to his landlady, and was afraid of meeting her. This was not because he was cowardly and abject, quite the contrary; but for some time past, he had been in an over-strained, irritable co