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Chinglish: Found in Translation
Chinglish: Found in Translation
Chinglish: Found in Translation
Chinglish: Found in Translation

Chinglish: Found in Translation

Product ID : 37814805
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Galleon Product ID 37814805
UPC / ISBN 1423603354
Shipping Weight 0.6 lbs
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Binding: Paperback
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Model
Manufacturer Imusti
Shipping Dimension 7.2 x 5.51 x 0.39 inches
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Author Oliver Lutz Radtke
Brand Imusti
Edition 2d Printing
Number Of Pages 112
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 2007-08-08
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Chinglish: Found in Translation Features

  • Gibbs Smith


About Chinglish: Found In Translation

Product Description Chinglish offers a humorous and insightful look at misuses of the English language in Chinese street signs, products, and advertising. A long-standing favorite of English speaking tourists and visitors, Chinglish is now quickly becoming a culture relic: in preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, the Chinese government was determined to wipe out incorrect English usage. Review “As China opens up to tourism, more and more signs have to be translated into English. But as these hilarious examples prove, something is usually lost in the translation.” ( Daily Mail (London) 2007-12-03) From the Publisher --Join author Oliver Lutz Radtke in saving these delightful works from extinction. The result is an appreciation of the joys sparked by language and creativity. --Chinese and English are the most common languages on earth. --The Beijing Tourism Bureau set up a hotline for visitors and residents to tip off examples of bad English in order to correct the signs. --With the 2008 Olympics approaching in Beijing the country is trying to correct all of its signage. The issue has been featured on the Today Show as well as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. --Some foreign teachers also refer to a school's inadequate language department as the "Chinglish Department." From the Inside Flap Oliver Lutz Radtke works as a television news producer in Singapore. --Join author Oliver Lutz Radtke in saving these delightful works from extinction. The result is an appreciation of the joys sparked by language and creativity. --Chinese and English are the most common languages on earth. --The Beijing Tourism Bureau set up a hotline for visitors and residents to tip off examples of bad English in order to correct the signs. --With the 2008 Olympics approaching in Beijing the country is trying to correct all of its signage. The issue has been featured on the Today Show as well as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. --Some foreign teachers also refer to a school's inadequate language department as the "Chinglish Department." From the Back Cover Welcome to the wonderful world of Chinglish, where humor and wisdom abound. Here you will welcome presence, be cautious of droppings, and show mercy to the slender grass. Perhaps you want to visit the fixed expectations district, or dine on choicely raw material? Wherever you go, whatever you do, always remember what your mother told you: wash after relief. About the Author Oliver Lutz Radtke works as a television news producer in Singapore. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. Chinglish-Excerpt Some instances in life happen with such intensity that they may well be regarded as the starting point for a wonderful friendship or a lifelong passion. I had such a moment on July 25, 2000. I was about to get off a taxi near the Shanghai Foreign Languages University, where I had recently started my scholarship year as a Chinese major, when a neat sticker on the inside of the door told me: “Don’t forget to carry your thing.” I was immediately fascinated, and I began to look everywhere for signs of “Chinglish.” I traveled the provinces and spotted it throughout, often in the most unexpected places. I found it on hotel room doors and brightly lit highway billboards, construction sites and soccer balls, condoms and pencil boxes. Chinglish exists because people travel and their language travels with them. Chinglish also exists because of China’s opening to the world, the tourism industry, state propaganda mechanisms, and the Internet. In preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games, Beijing is gearing up an immense amount of manpower to eradicate Chinglish from the capital, and the Chinese government plans to extend this linguistic cleansing to the rest of the country as well. My aim is to show the nowadays endangered species of Chinglish in its natural habitat.