X

We specialize in hard to find items

Galleon.PH - Discover, Share, Buy!
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Product ID : 11221924
4.6 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 11221924
UPC / ISBN 081298160X
Shipping Weight 0.66 lbs
I think this is wrong?
Binding: Paperback
(see available options)
Model 081298160X
Manufacturer Random House Trade Paperbacks
Shipping Dimension 7.8 x 5.12 x 1.1 inches
I think this is wrong?
Author Charles Duhigg
Brand Random House Trade
Number Of Pages 416
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 2014-01-07
Release Date 2014-01-07
-
Save 36%
Before ₱ 1,502
959

*Price and Stocks may change without prior notice
  • 3 Day Return Policy
  • All products are genuine and original
  • Cash On Delivery/Cash Upon Pickup Available

Pay with

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life Features

  • Random House Trade


About The Power Of Habit: Why We Do What We Do In Life

Product Description NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • This instant classic explores how we can change our lives by changing our habits.NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Wall Street Journal • Financial TimesIn The Power of Habit, award-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to the sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential. At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives. With a new Afterword by the author   “Sharp, provocative, and useful.” —Jim Collins   “Few [books] become essential manuals for business and living. The Power of Habit is an exception. Charles Duhigg not only explains how habits are formed but how to kick bad ones and hang on to the good.” —Financial Times   “A flat-out great read.” —David Allen, bestselling author of Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity “You’ll never look at yourself, your organization, or your world quite the same way.” —Daniel H. Pink, bestselling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind “Entertaining . . . enjoyable . . . fascinating . . . a serious look at the science of habit formation and change.” —The New York Times Book Review Amazon.com Review Q&A with Charles Duhigg Q. What sparked your interest in habits? A. I first became interested in the science of habits eight years ago, as a newspaper reporter in Baghdad, when I heard about an army major conducting an experiment in a small town named Kufa. The major had analyzed videotapes of riots and had found that violence was often preceded by a crowd of Iraqis gathering in a plaza and, over the course of hours, growing in size. Food vendors would show up, as well as spectators. Then, someone would throw a rock or a bottle. When the major met with Kufa’s mayor, he made an odd request: Could they keep food vendors out of the plazas? Sure, the mayor said. A few weeks later, a small crowd gathered near the Great Mosque of Kufa. It grew in size. Some people started chanting angry slogans. At dusk, the crowd started getting restless and hungry. People looked for the kebab sellers normally filling the plaza, but there were none to be found. The spectators left. The chanters became dispirited. By 8 p.m., everyone was gone. I asked the major how he had figured out that removing food vendors would change peoples' behavior. The U.S. military, he told me, is one of the biggest habit-formation experiments in history. “Understanding habits is the most important thing I’ve learned in the army,” he said. By the time I got back to the U.S., I was hooked on the topic. Q. How have your own habits changed as a result of writing this book? A. Since starting work on this book, I've lost about 30 pounds, I run every other morning (I'm training for the NY Marathon later this year), and I'm much more productive. And the reason why is because I've learned to diagnose my habits, and how to change them. Take, for instance, a bad habit I had of eating a cookie every afternoon. By learning how to analyze my habit, I figured out that the reason I walked to the cafeteria each day wasn't because I was craving a chocolate chip cookie. It was because I was craving socialization, the company of talking to my colleagues while munching. That was the habit's real reward. And the cue for my behavior - the trigger that caused me to automatically stand up and wander to the cafeteria, was a certain time of day. So, I reconstructed the habit: now,