X

Buy Products not in the Philippines

Galleon.PH - Discover, Share, Buy!
Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

Product ID : 10930053
4.8 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 10930053
UPC / ISBN 884155493425 / 9780805095159
Shipping Weight 0.8 lbs
I think this is wrong?
Binding: Hardcover
(see available options)
Model
Manufacturer Metropolitan Books
Shipping Dimension 8.39 x 5.71 x 1.1 inches
I think this is wrong?
Author Atul Gawande
Brand Metropolitan Books
Edition 1
Format Deckle Edge
Number Of Pages 304
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 2014-10-07
Release Date 2014-10-07
UPC 884155493425
-
Save 34%
Before ₱ 2,311
1,527

*Used item/s available.
*Price and Stocks may change without prior notice
  • 3 Day Return Policy
  • All products are genuine and original
  • Cash On Delivery/Cash Upon Pickup Available

Pay with

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End Features

  • In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending


About Being Mortal: Medicine And What Matters In The End

An Amazon Best Book of the Month, October 2014: True or false: Modern medicine is a miracle that has transformed all of our lives. If you said “true,” you’d be right, of course, but that’s a statement that demands an asterisk, a “but.” “We’ve been wrong about what our job is in medicine,” writes Atul Gawande, a surgeon (at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston) and a writer (at the New Yorker). “We think. . .[it] is to ensure health and survival. But really. . .it is to enable well-being. And well-being is about the reasons one wishes to be alive.” Through interviews with doctors, stories from and about health care providers (such as the woman who pioneered the notion of “assisted living” for the elderly)—and eventually, by way of the story of his own father’s dying, Gawande examines the cracks in the system of health care to the aged (i.e. 97 percent of medical students take no course in geriatrics) and to the seriously ill who might have different needs and expectations than the ones family members predict. (One striking example: the terminally ill former professor who told his daughter that “quality of life” for him meant the ongoing ability to enjoy chocolate ice cream and watch football on TV. If medical treatments might remove those pleasures, well, then, he wasn’t sure he would submit to such treatments.) Doctors don’t listen, Gawande suggests—or, more accurately, they don’t know what to listen for. (Gawande includes examples of his own failings in this area.) Besides, they’ve been trained to want to find cures, attack problems—to win. But victory doesn’t look the same to everyone, he asserts. Yes, “death is the enemy,” he writes. “But the enemy has superior forces. Eventually, it wins. And in a war that you cannot win, you don’t want a general who fights to the point of total annihilation. You don’t want Custer. You want Robert E. Lee... someone who knows how to fight for territory that can be won and how to surrender it when it c