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The Road to Escondido

Product ID : 1773141
4.5 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 1773141
UPC / ISBN 790214498471
Shipping Weight 0.05 lbs
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Model 2030606
Manufacturer Various Artists
Shipping Dimension 5.51 x 4.88 x 0.39 inches
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Brand Reprise
Genre Blues
Number Of Discs 1
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 2006-11-07
Release Date 2006-11-07
UPC 790214498471
-
486

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Features

  • This CD has been professionally cleaned and resurfaced. Item is in 100% working order and guaranteed. CD case not included.

Description

J.J. Cale penned two of Eric Clapton's career-defining solo hits, "Cocaine" and "After Midnight." And since Clapton has often fashioned his persona in a WWJD manner (what would J.J. do?), this collaboration is long overdue. But despite the rather slick production and long list of guest backing musicians (including four bassists, four drummers, five other guitarists, and three percussionists), The Road to Escondido is still dominated more by Cale than Clapton. The relatively reticent Okie wrote 11 of the 14 tracks, and it's his low-key soufflé of blues, jazz, and country that shapes and directs the disc's tone, with Clapton along for the ride. The opening "Danger" sets the dusky mood as the duo rides a typical Cale swamp groove that gives way to a tightly wound Slowhand solo. They trade lead vocals on a lovely version of the after-hours jazz blues classic "Sporting Life Blues," and the ubiquitous John Mayer makes an impressive appearance on the subtle blues of "Hard to Thrill."Clapton hasn't sounded this relaxed or involved in his own material for years. The traditionally laid-back, if not quite snoozy, Cale responds with a comparatively energized performance, likely due to the high-profile company. When the two harmonize on the mid-tempo foot tapper "Anyway the Wind Blows," the result is so natural and spontaneous it's a shame these two didn't join forces earlier. On paper, it appears that Cale has the most to gain from partnering with an established superstar, but the fact is this collaboration yields Eric Clapton's most engaging and contagious roots-rock release in a long time. --Hal Horowitz