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Love in the Time of Cholera
Love in the Time of Cholera

Love in the Time of Cholera (Oprah's Book Club)

Product ID : 17296405
4.3 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 17296405
UPC / ISBN 9780307389732
Shipping Weight 0.62 lbs
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Binding: Paperback
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Model
Manufacturer Vintage
Shipping Dimension 7.95 x 5.55 x 0.87 inches
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Author Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Brand Vintage Books USA
Edition Reprint
Number Of Pages 368
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 2007-10-05
Release Date 2007-10-05
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Love in the Time of Cholera Features

  • Oprah's Book Club

  • First Vintage Publishing Edition


About Love In The Time Of Cholera

Product Description INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER • "A love story of astonishing power" (Newsweek), the acclaimed modern literary classic by the beloved Nobel Prize-winning author In their youth, Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza fall passionately in love. When Fermina eventually chooses to marry a wealthy, well-born doctor, Florentino is devastated, but he is a romantic. As he rises in his business career he whiles away the years in 622 affairs--yet he reserves his heart for Fermina. Her husband dies at last, and Florentino purposefully attends the funeral. Fifty years, nine months, and four days after he first declared his love for Fermina, he will do so again. Review “This shining and heartbreaking novel may be one of the greatest love stories ever told.” -- The New York Times Book Review“A love story of astonishing power…. Altogether extraordinary.” -- Newsweek  “Brilliant, provocative…magical…splendid writing.” -- Chicago Tribune  “Beguiling, masterly storytelling…. García Márquez writes about love as saving grace, the force that makes life worthwhile.” -- Newsday   “A sumptuous book…[with] major themes of love, death, the torments of memory, the inexorability of old age.” -- The Washington Post Book World About the Author Gabriel García Márquez was born in Colombia in 1927. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982. He is the author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including One Hundred Years of Solitude, Love In The Time Cholera, The Autumn Of The Patriarch, The General In His Labyrinth, and News Of A Kidnapping. He died in 2014. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. IT WAS INEVITABLE: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of unrequited love. Dr. Juvenal Urbino noticed it as soon as he entered the still darkened house where he had hurried on an urgent call to attend a case that for him had lost all urgency many years before. The Antillean refugee Jeremiah de Saint-Amour, disabled war veteran, photographer of children, and his most sympathetic opponent in chess, had escaped the torments of memory with the aromatic fumes of gold cyanide. He found the corpse covered with a blanket on the campaign cot where he had always slept, and beside it was a stool with the developing tray he had used to vaporize the poison. On the floor, tied to a leg of the cot, lay the body of a black Great Dane with a snow-white chest, and next to him were the crutches. At one window the splendor of dawn was just beginning to illuminate the stifling, crowded room that served as both bedroom and laboratory, but there was enough light for him to recognize at once the authority of death. The other windows, as well as every other chink in the room, were muffled with rags or sealed with black cardboard, which increased the oppressive heaviness. A counter was crammed with jars and bottles without labels and two crumbling pewter trays under an ordinary light bulb covered with red paper. The third tray, the one for the fixative solution, was next to the body. There were old magazines and newspapers everywhere, piles of negatives on glass plates, broken furniture, but everything was kept free of dust by a diligent hand. Although the air coming through the window had purified the atmosphere, there still remained for the one who could identify it the dying embers of hapless love in the bitter almonds. Dr. Juvenal Urbino had often thought, with no premonitory intention, that this would not be a propitious place for dying in a state of grace. But in time he came to suppose that perhaps its disorder obeyed an obscure determination of Divine Providence. A police inspector had come forward with a very young medical student who was completing his forensic training at the municipal dispensary, and it was they who had ventilated the room and covered the body while waiting for Dr. Urbino to arrive. They greeted him with a solemnity that on this occasion had more of condo