X

Buy Products not in the Philippines

Galleon.PH - Discover, Share, Buy!
Category:
Reference
Writing
Travel
One Thousand Roads to Mecca: Ten Centuries of
One Thousand Roads to Mecca: Ten Centuries of

One Thousand Roads to Mecca: Ten Centuries of Travelers Writing About the Muslim Pilgrimage

Product ID : 16089392
5 out of 5 stars


Galleon Product ID 16089392
UPC / ISBN 0802116116
Shipping Weight 2 lbs
I think this is wrong?
Binding: Hardcover
(see available options)
Model
Manufacturer Brand: Grove Pr
Shipping Dimension 9.09 x 6.3 x 1.61 inches
I think this is wrong?
Brand Brand: Grove Pr
Edition 1st
Number Of Pages 620
Package Quantity 1
Publication Date 1997-06-01
-
3,261

*Used item/s available.
*Price and Stocks may change without prior notice
  • 3 Day Return Policy
  • All products are genuine and original
  • Cash On Delivery/Cash Upon Pickup Available

Pay with

One Thousand Roads to Mecca: Ten Centuries of Features

  • Used Book in Good Condition


About One Thousand Roads To Mecca: Ten Centuries Of

A journey to Mecca, the Hajj, is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, an undertaking that every Muslim should attempt at least once in his or her life. By leaving their homes and possessions and taking to the road to travel to the birthplace of Islam, Muslims are reminded that all humans are equal before God. It's no wonder, then, that the Hajj has been a central theme of Islamic travel-writing since the 7th century, A.D. One Thousand Roads to Mecca is a collection of more than 20 accounts of the Hajj spanning ten centuries. The writers collected in this anthology reflect the geographic diversity of Islam. These pilgrims come from all over the world: Morocco, India, Persia, England, Italy, and the United States. They travel by boat and camel, on foot and horseback and, most recently, by airplane; many suffered all the hardships and dangers attached to a long pilgrimage of months or even years through deserts and over mountains, across lands populated by brigands and thieves. But along with the hazards are descriptions of of Cairo and Damascus at the height of their glory during the medieval period and anecdotes and observations that render the cosmopolitan nature of the pilgrims. In addition to the writings of Muslim pilgrims, there are also several accounts by non-Muslim westerners who, by hook or by crook, gained access to the forbidden city of Mecca and then wrote about it. One Thousand Roads to Mecca is both classic travel literature at its best and a wonderful introduction to the tenets and practices of a frequently misunderstood religion.